Volume 10, Issue 1 (5-1996)                   Med J Islam Repub Iran 1996 | Back to browse issues page


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SHEIKHREZAE A, F. TABATABAI S A, NAZARI R, BEHZADI G, HUSSAIN KHAN Z. OMENTAL GRAFT APPLICABILITY IN EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED SPINAL CORD COMPRESSION IN RATS. Med J Islam Repub Iran. 1996; 10 (1) :11-16
URL: http://mjiri.iums.ac.ir/article-1-1211-en.html

From the Department of Neurosurgery, Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran
Abstract:   (2160 Views)
One of the most important factors responsible for axonal degeneration following spinal cord trauma is ischemia produced by cord compression. Previous studies have revealed that omental transposition upon the injured site of the spinal cord could be beneficial in the induction of partial improvement of neuroelectrical and motor function in laboratory animals. The purpose of this study is to verify the effects of early placement of pedicled omentum on recently traumatized rat spinal cord as measured by subsequent clinical, electromyography (EMG), motor evoked potential (MEP) and horse-radish peroxidase (HRP) labelling methods. Forty rats were divided into two groups (A&B). Atter anesthesia, laminectomies were performed at T12level and the left lateral half of.the spinal cord was compressed intradurally by an aneurysm clip for seven minutes in both groups. The omentum was transposed in group B rats on the lesioned site. After 3-5 months, evaluation of the muscular forces in the affected limb according to modified Tarlov's classification showed a significant difference between the two groups (P < 0.01). EMG showed a greater degree of spasticity in nongrafted animals than grafted ones. MEP showed a powerful signal in grafted animals, but only a weak signal was recorded in the nongrafted group. Injection of HRP into the spinal cord below the compression site demonstrated retrogradely labelle d neurons above the compression site in grafted animals, but transmission of HRP was not seen in nongrafted animals. These results show that transposition of omentum on the injured site of recently traumatized rat spinal cord could be helpful in axonal regeneration.
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Type of Study: Original Research | Subject: Neurosurgery