Volume 18, Number 4 (11-2005)                   Med J Islam Repub Iran 2005 | Back to browse issues page


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HADDADIAN K, REZAEE O, SADEGHI S, MODARRES ZAMANI A, SHARIFI G, ALI ASGARI A. CERVICAL SPONDYLOTIC MYELOPATHY: THE PATTERN OF NEUROLOGIC DEF ICITS AND IMPROVEMENT FOLLOWING ANTERIOR. Med J Islam Repub Iran. 2005; 18 (4) :331-335
URL: http://mjiri.iums.ac.ir/article-1-616-en.html

From Loghman Hakim Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. , guivesharifi@hotmail.com
Abstract:   (2099 Views)
We evaluated the specific pattern of pre- and postoperative neurological signs and symptoms of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) to determine [mdings which had a predictive value for surgical outcome. Consecutive patients with CSM caused by osteophytic ridge or intervertebral disc herniation who underwent anterior cervical decompression and fusion in Loghman Hakim Hospital from 1999-2003 were prospectively enrolled. Patients were evaluated postoperatively by office visit. Outcome was assessed by objective neurological examination and scoring with multiple functional rating scales. Forty - three patients (30 male, 13 female) with a mean age of 48.8 years fulfilled our inclusion criteria. The most common preoperative symptoms were sensory deficit in distal upper limbs (88.4%), gait disturbance (69.8%) and sensory deficit of distal lower limbs (58.1 %). The most common signs were hyperreflexia (95.3%), Hoffman's sign (93%) and Babinski's sign (83.7%). Vertebral osteophyte and soft disc herniation were found in 86% and 14% of the patients, respectively. Overall functional improvement, evaluated by using a modification of the Japanese Orthopedic Association Scale was noted in 79.7% of the patients who had an abnormal scale preoperatively. Strength improved considerably and significantly after operation. However, less than half of the patients experienced functional improvement in the lower limbs, a discrepancy that was probably caused by persistent spasticity. Atrophy of the hand muscles, preoperative spastic gait and cord atrophy as shown in MRI were poor prognostic factors.
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