Volume 14, Issue 3 (11-2000)                   Med J Islam Repub Iran 2000 | Back to browse issues page


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BAKHTIARI J, SABERI-AFSHAR F, NOORBALA H, GHARAGOZLO M, VESHKINI A. URINARY BLADDER RECONSTRUCTION USING FRESH AND FORMALIN-PRESERVED BOVINE AMNION IN DOGS. Med J Islam Repub Iran. 2000; 14 (3) :277-281
URL: http://mjiri.iums.ac.ir/article-1-865-en.html

From the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Tehran
Abstract:   (2157 Views)
The use of bovine amnion in the urinary tract for reconstructive purposes following ablative surgery in cases of trauma, cancer or infection is now a common practice in urological surgery. To evaluate urinary bladder reconstruction with bovine amniotic membrane (BAM), ten healthy mongrel dogs of either sex weighing 10-40 kg were used. The animals were randomly divided into two groups of five animals each. A piece of the cranial wall of the bladder 5 cm in diameter was resected and replaced with fresh and formalin-preserved BAM respectively. The graft compatibility was evaluated on the basis of clinical, biochemical ultrasonographical, radiological and histopathological changes. Clinically all of the dogs were dull and depressed with blood tinged urine for the first few post-operative days. The biochemical parameters didn't show any significant changes in BUN and creatinine. Ultrasonographic findings consisted of floating masses in the bladder lumen (40%), chronic cystitis (10%), bladder adhesion with adjacent tissues (90%) and radiological findings were lack of normal distension of the graft site (100%) and filling defect (30%). No inflammatory responses and leakage were observed. The regeneration of uroepithelium, and proliferation of granulation tissue, infiltration of lymphoid cells, degenerative changes at the junction of the bladder and graft and heterotopic bone formation were observed. Keeping in view the compatibility of the fresh and preserved BAM, this study showed that it can act as a scaffold for repairing urinary bladder defects in dogs.
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Type of Study: Original Research | Subject: Urology and Nephrology