Volume 37, Issue 1 (2-2023)                   Med J Islam Repub Iran 2023 | Back to browse issues page


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Department of Occupational Therapy, Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation Research Center, School of Rehabilitation Sciences, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran , mahany@ajums.ac.ir
Abstract:   (396 Views)
Background: Dependence in bathing is the most common activities of daily living (ADLs) dependency among older adults. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of bathing skills training on the independence and satisfaction of older adults living in nursing homes.
   Methods: In this randomized controlled trial, 80 participants were assigned randomly to the intervention (n = 40) and control groups (n = 40). The intervention group received 10 weekly bathing skills training sessions, with each session lasting about 60 minutes, while the control group received no direct training. The evaluation was conducted using the Modified Barthel Index (MBI) and the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM). Analysis of variance for repeated measurements was used to test the effect of intervention at the baseline, post-intervention, and follow-up.
   Results: The mean improvement in the MBI was greater for the intervention group (P < 0.001; partial η2 = 0.34), which remained significant at the follow-up (P < 0.001; partial η2 = 0.41). The greater mean change of the COPM–Performance was significant in the intervention group (P < 0.001; partial η2 = 0.17), which remained significant at the follow-up (P < 0.001; partial η2 = 0.19). The greater mean improvement of the COPM–Satisfaction was observed for the intervention group (P < 0.001; partial η2 = 0.36), which remained at the follow-up (P = 0.001; partial η2 = 0.42).
   Conclusion: Bathing skills training is effective in improving the ADLs independence and satisfaction in older adults living in nursing homes; thus, it is recommended to be included in the schedules of nursing homes. 
 
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Type of Study: Original Research | Subject: Occupational Therapy

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