Volume 11, Number 3 (11-1997)                   Med J Islam Repub Iran 1997 | Back to browse issues page


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JANGHORBANI M, SADEGHIGOLMAKANI N. PASSIVE SMOKING AND THE RISK OF CORONARY HEART DISEASE AMONG MARRIED NON-SMOKING WOMEN. Med J Islam Repub Iran. 1997; 11 (3) :203-208
URL: http://mjiri.iums.ac.ir/article-1-1092-en.html

From the Department of Epidemiology, Medical School, Kerman University of Medical Sciences and Health Services, Kerman, Islamic Republic of Iran.
Abstract:   (2045 Views)
Several epidemiological studies have reported that passive smoking (PS) is a public health hazard and perhaps increases the risk of heart disease. This study evaluated the relationship between female coronary heart disease and PS among married women who described themselves as non-smokers in an area of south-east Iran. Using household exposure to tobacco smoke as an estimate of PS, a hospitalbased case-control study of CHD was conducted in Kerman, Iran. We interviewed 200 married female CHD cases, aged 42-84 years (mean [standard error, SE] 60.0 [0.5]) and 400 hospital-based controls aged 42-85 (mean [SE] 60.3 [0.4]). The controls were non-CHD patients, selected from the same hospital as the cases, and matched for marital status and age (±5 years). All of the cases and controls had never smoked. Information on PS was collected for each person. The prevalence of PS at home was 39% for cases and 32.3% for controls. The corresponding prevalence rates for PS at work were 1.5% and 0.8%. Household PS increases the risk of female CHD, but this increase was not statistic all y significant. Compared to non-smokers, exposure to husband's smoking increases the risk by about 40% (odds ratio (OR) 1.40, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.96-2.05), although no trends were observed with the number of years of exposure. The OR increases with an increase in PS (p<0.05). The odds ratio for PS at work did not suggest an increased risk. The results suggest that passive exposure to cigarette smoke may have a deleterious effect on the health of non-smokers and that married non-smoking women may be at an increased risk of developing CHD through passive exposure to their husband's cigarette smoke.
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Type of Study: Original Research | Subject: Epidemiology