Volume 10, Number 1 (5-1996)                   Med J Islam Repub Iran 1996 | Back to browse issues page


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ASADOLLAHI G, GHANEI M, AZAMI M, PEZESHKI A. SURV EY OF THE PREVALENCE RATE OF BEHAVIORAL DISORDERS AMONG THALASSEMI C PATIENTS IN ISFAHAN. Med J Islam Repub Iran. 1996; 10 (1) :27-30
URL: http://mjiri.iums.ac.ir/article-1-1214-en.html

From the Psychiatry Department, Khorshid Hospital, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan.
Abstract:   (1983 Views)
Chronic diseases have been identified as predisposing factors in behavioral disorders and the prevalence of these disorders is known to be higher in patients than in control groups. Thalassemia too, plays an effective role in increasing the prevalence of behavioral disorders. In order to recognize the prevalence of behavioral disorders in thalassemic patients, a study was performed on 257 patients (144 boys and 113 girls). A control group was considered for comparison, the members of which were chosen from healthy sisters and brothers of the patients, otherwise from their fIrst class family members, and ultimately from their neighbours. The diagnosis of behavioral disorders was based on DSM-III-R and the required information was collected by questionnaires that were filled in by the parents and by interviewing the patients themselves. The following results were obtained in the final inspection: 1) the prevalence of separation anxiety (P = 0.000), enuresis (P = 0.021) and depression (P = 0.002) was higher in thalassemic patients, and 2) other disorders under study (oppositional disorders, attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity, conduct disorder, avoidance disorder,- over-anxious disorder, pica, encopresis, stuttering, elective mutism and stereotyped-habitual behaviors) did not show a significant difference regarding a P-value above 0.05.
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Type of Study: Original Research | Subject: Psychiatry