Volume 18, Number 4 (11-2005)                   Med J Islam Repub Iran 2005 | Back to browse issues page


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SAMADIKHAH J, HAKIM S H, ALIZADEH ASL A, AZARFARIN R. STUDY OF THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN ACTIVITY LEVEL AT ONSET OF SYMPTOMS AND PATIENT OUTCOME OF F IRST ACUTE MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION. Med J Islam Repub Iran. 2005; 18 (4) :293-296
URL: http://mjiri.iums.ac.ir/article-1-609-en.html

Assistant Professor , azarfarinr@yahoo.com
Abstract:   (2012 Views)
This study sought to compare the clinical features and outcome of a first acute myocardial infarction (AMI) with onset of symptoms during or within 30 minutes of exercise, at rest and in bed. Information collected using a standard questionnaire was used to relate activity at the onset of symptoms and in-hospital outcome in 500 consecutive patients admitted to our heart center with a first AMI between 2000-2002. Patients with exercise-related onset were more likely to be younger and male. Those with onset in bed were more likely to be older and have a history of stable or unstable angina. By way of comparison between patients whose symptoms began at rest and exercise, those with exercise-related onset had lower in-hospital mortality after adjusting for age and gender [odd's ratio (OR) 0.53, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.39-0.93 (p= 0.03)]. Compared with patients whose symptoms began at rest, patients with onset in bed had a higher mortality rate [OR 1.42,95% CI 1.03 -1.98 (p= 0.028)]. The incidence of moderate or severe left ventricular dysfunction was also lower for exercise -related onset [OR 0.79,95% CI 0.6-1.01 (p= 0.32-but not statistically significant)] and higher when onset was in bed [OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.2-1.77 (p=0.039)]. There is an association between activity at onset and outcome of AMI. Differences in pathophysiology or in the population at risk could explain this observation.
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Type of Study: Original Research: Clinical Science | Subject: Heart

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