Volume 17, Number 4 (2-2004)                   Med J Islam Repub Iran 2004 | Back to browse issues page


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ATAEE KACHOEE R A, BEHZADIAN NEJAD Q. EFFECT OF AMYGDALUS COMMUNIS ON GROWTH AND TOXIN PRODUCTION OF CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE . Med J Islam Repub Iran. 2004; 17 (4) :337-341
URL: http://mjiri.iums.ac.ir/article-1-671-en.html

From the Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine and Military Medicine Institute, Health Research Center, Baqiyatallah (a.s.) University of Medical Sciences, Tehran , ataee@bmsu.ac.ir
Abstract:   (2042 Views)
It is known that the major etiologic agent of pseudomembranous colitis in man is Clostridium difficile. With respect to traditional use of almond paste in the treatment of infantile diarrhea, we studied the effects of the aqueous extract of Amygdalus communis (AEAC) on the growth and toxin production of Clostridium difficile in culture medium and the rabbit ligated ileal loop. Three groups of male New Zealand white rabbits (1.5 -2 kg) were used in this study and ligated segments of the small intestine (4 -5cm) were prepared and injected with 1 mL of 24 hour extract culture filtrate, a mixture of vegetative cells of Clostridium difficile and different concentrations of AEAC, 1 mL mixture of purified toxins (A and B) and AEAC, and 1mL suspension of bacterium (10000 CFU/mL) alone. The results of this study revealed that AEAC at a concentration above 80 mg/mL completely inhibited the growth of Clostridium difficile. Although concentrations below 80 mg/mL of AEAC did not inhibit bacterial growth, synthesis or excretion of toxins A and B were inhibited. Injection of the mixture of AEAC and toxins A and B into the ligated segments of the small intestine yielded a positive result with no fluid accumulation at a level acceptable for diarrhea in comparison with positive controls (p<0.0 1). In conclusion, although inoculation of bacterial suspension plus AEAC into the ileum of the animal model prevented colonization, growth, and toxin production, the results varied according to the concentration of both AEAC and number of viable bacteria. Thus, the significance of these results relative to the use of almond paste in prevention of gastrointestinal disease due to Clostridium difficile, requires further study
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Type of Study: Original Research | Subject: Microbiology and Anatomy

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